Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: “The chains on all my people are the chains on me: Restrictions to collective autonomy undermine the personal autonomy and psychological well-being of group members”: Correction to Kachanoff et al. (2019).

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Reports an error in "The chains on all my people are the chains on me: Restrictions to collective autonomy undermine the personal autonomy and psychological well-being of group members" by Frank J. Kachanoff, Donald M. Taylor, Julie Caouette, Thomas H. Khullar and Michael J. A. Wohl (Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2019[Jan], Vol 116[1], 141-165). In the article, an error was detected in the syntax used to compute the ICCs and values reported in Study 2 and Study 4. In Study 2, the ICCs reported in the Results section should be as follows: collective autonomy restriction (ICC = .65, 95% CI [.63, .66], personal autonomy (ICC = .51, 95% CI [.48, .53], and psychological well-being (ICC .59, 95% CI [.57, .61]. In Study 4 the ICCs reported in the Multi-level analysis strategy subsection and in Table 11 should be as follows: collective autonomy restriction (ICC .57, 95% CI [.52, .61]; personal autonomy = 0; personal competence = 0; Satisfaction with GQ avatar = .06 [.02, .20]; Enjoyment of GQ = .04 [.01, .22]; Group identification = .09 [.04, .19]; Collective agency = .17 [.11, .25]; Personal autonomy support = .01 [.00, .97]. The for Personal autonomy support from ingroup members reported in Table 12 should be .005. The supplemental material has been updated. These changes do not alter the main significance tests reported for the relevant studies, nor do they change the interpretation or conclusions that can be drawn from the results. The online version of this article has been corrected. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2018-00811-001.) Four studies assessed the potentially detrimental effects that restrictions to collective autonomy (i.e., a group's freedom to determine and practice its own identity) may have for the personal autonomy and psychological well-being of group members. In Study 1, using 3 distinct samples (NSample1a = 123, NSample1b = 129, NSample1c = 370), correlational and cross-cultural evidence indicates that perceived restrictions to the collective autonomy of one's group is directly associated with reduced personal autonomy, and indirectly associated with diminished well-being through personal autonomy. In Study 2 (N = 411), a longitudinal assessment of group members over 3 time-points during a 4-month period found that group members who perceived greater collective autonomy restriction also experienced reduced personal autonomy, and in turn, reduced psychological well-being over time. In Study 3 (N = 255), group members described a time during which their ingroup had (or did not have) its collective autonomy unduly restricted by other groups. Participants who were primed to think that their group lacked collective autonomy reported reduced feelings of personal autonomy, and reduced psychological well-being (compared with those primed to think their group had collective autonomy). In Study 4 (N = 389), collective autonomy was manipulated within the context of an intensive laboratory simulation. Collective autonomy-restricted group members experienced less personal autonomy than those who did not have their collective autonomy restricted. Together these findings suggest that restrictions to a group's collective autonomy may have detrimental consequences for the personal autonomy and psychological well-being of group members. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)